Jackson Taylor & the Sinners / Bovine / Dan Tedesco at PJ’s Lager House

Sat, Aug 13, 2016 @ 8:00 pm to 2:00am

View event on Facebook

Saturday, August 13 / 8pm / $10
Jackson Taylor & The Sinners (Country/Rock/Honky tonk)
Bovine (Rock)
Dan Tedesco (Alternative/Folk)

Jackson Taylor & the Sinners: Jackson Taylor is a story teller, plain and simple.

Jackson Taylor tells stories about what he knows — life. Jackson’s lyrics paint tales of lives filled with passion and joy as much as of a life tainted by sorrow and disappointment – his life. Jackson sings of heaven and hell, beauty and grit – Jackson sings of real life.

Born one of eleven siblings to parents of migrant workers, his life began in Moody, Texas, a small town just north of Austin. It was a nomadic existence stripped of the comforts and security that most take for granted. Jackson’s roots instead became deep seeded in his love for music, a passion passed on to Jackson at an early age by his father who would steal away whenever possible to see and hear country greats like Waylon, Willie, and Billy Joe Shaver perform, often with Jackson in tow.

Jackson’s adolescence was spent bouncing from one migrant labor town to another, finally settling in a small farming town in Washington State. After graduating high school, he moved back to Texas for a while but soon left to try and make his mark in Nashville. There, Jackson found work as a songwriter, but life for Jackson was still a steep uphill climb, and after a couple of tough and frustrating years, Jackson had to face the hard truth that Nashville was not the “home” for which he had spent his whole life searching.

From New York City to Los Angeles, Jackson has finally found his rightful home, ironically right back where his life began — in Texas.

Combining his real life experiences with old school country elements, and throwing in the flavors of punk and southern rock to create a style all his own, Jackson Taylor continues to break the rules of traditional country music with his straightforward lyrics, “take it or leave it” approach, intense live performances, and the drive and determination of a freight train. The end result can not be pigeon holed into any style and can only be rightfully defined as what it is: “Jackson Taylor Music”.

Billy Joe Shaver summed up it up best when he said, “Jackson’s songs are so real and honest, you know straight off he’s been there and done that. He writes and sings like he lives, great songs that I believe will live forever.”

Bovine: A fire-branded mix of KYUSS, QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE, early SOUNDGARDEN and BARONESS, BOVINE’s bottom-heavy and primal assault will surely leave many a listener convulsing on the floor. The UK band’s tuneful and, at times, space-proggish, approach to songwriting will make the experience as enjoyable as it is bone-rattling. Let the stampede begin.

Dan Tedesco: My story is…..that I have no story, per se. I come from a solid family. It’s a point of pride. I grew up in the far west suburbs of Chicago. My folks weren’t rich, but there wasn’t much that I was left wanting. I’ve never been arrested. Always got good grades. I never developed any major drug addictions (at least, not yet). The only serious addiction in my life, if you’d like to call it that, has been with music. Let me bring you up to speed.

Piano at age 5.
Violin at age 9.
Guitar at age 11 after hearing Eddie Van Halen. And that, as they say, is all she wrote. I’ve been madly in love with it ever since.

Growing up my ears were fortunate enough to be treated to a fairly eclectic musical mix: The Beatles, Dylan, Paul Simon, James Taylor, The Band, The Beach Boys, Pink Floyd, CCR, Bob Seger, Bruce Springsteen, Tom Petty. Even a healthy dose of Mozart, Beethoven and Wagner. A friend in my neighborhood used to make cassette mixes for me: The Who, They Might Be Giants, The Police, The Clash. I missed the grunge period, and it wouldn’t be until nearly a decade later that I’d discover the power of Nirvana, Pearl Jam and Soundgarden. Once I found the guitar, things focused in a touch. It wasn’t unusual for me to fall asleep at night to the sounds of guitar wizards like Joe Satriani and Eric Johnson. And the random Van Halen record was never far away.

Then there was the jazz period. Wes Montgomery. Joe Pass. George Benson. Charlie Christian. John Coltrane. Elvin Jones. McCoy Tyner. The things I learned from those guys. Man. It’s everything really. The spirit of jazz. The freedom of it. That’s been it’s great influence on me.

But I was always a rock ’n roll kid. Pete Townsend more than Pat Metheny. And, ultimately, I craved power chords over the complex harmonies of jazz.

High school was a weird time. I straddled the jock world, playing baseball, and the music world, as a member of the high school jazz band. Most mornings, after being dropped off by the bus, everyone would hang out in the lunchroom before first period. Not me. I’d head straight to a room adjacent to the school’s band rehearsal hall, writing music on the computer. Like I said, it was an addiction. Outside of school, I jammed in a duo with one of my best friend’s, who happened to be a fantastic drummer. We wrote all kinds of stuff. Lots of instrumental music (queue the Satriani). Recorded various demos. But neither of us sang. That made it hard to play out. And most of the other kids were interested in the classics: Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, The Stones. They weren’t interested in what we had going on.

So, like many of my heroes, I was a bit of a social outcast. That, if anything, was and has always been my struggle. Everyone has at least one. And I found my comfort, security and confidence in the world out on the fringe, populated by the misfits. The world of rock ’n roll.

Let Me Play My Old Guitar, and sing for you my song
Let Me Play My Old Guitar, and sing for you my song
I promise you my friend
I Will Not Do You Wrong

– DT